The Savannah Sunburn Half and 10k

10K, 1 Mile

Event Date

Sat, Sep 16, 2017

Address

Pooler, GA

Pricing

Activity Today Later

10k

$10 $10 Register

10k

$10 $10 Register

Half Marathon

$15 $15 Register

Half Marathon

$15 $15 Register

About This Activity

The Savannah Sunburn 10k and Half Marathon 2016

The Savannah Summers are long and hot and the sun burns bright. We are drawling attention to the impact the sun has on our skin.  Mostly flat, partially closed and the course provides a relaxed training run. It is hot!!! Straight!! and Low frills. Sign up early and get commited to training. Use this as a motivator to get you to the Rock and Roll Marathon, the bridge run or Tybee, of Skidaway 2017.

Electronic Non-Chip timing
Finisher Medal
Bag and Key Check option
7:30am start to get out before the heat sets in
free photos

Early Bird Special Until July 1st - $10 10K / $15 Half

Pricing Until August 1st - $20 10k / $25 Half

Registration Until Sept 1st - $30 10k / $45 Half

Late Registration - $35 10k/ $50 Half

 
Onsite Registration is Available at packet pickup 9/15 and at the race until 7:15am Sat 9/16

Registration includes ERS finisher medals to every runner.

Packet Pickup - Pre event location TBD

Savannah's Medals 4 Mettle Program: The Milestone is a great opportunity to earn a medal for a child fighting cancer. Run this half marathon and donate your finisher medal to the Memorial Children's Hospital. We will put a special ribbon the medal and it will be used to celebrate a Milestone like the end of Chemo (That can be a 3 year process).

Learn About Skin Cancer

Each year in the U.S. over 5.4 million cases of non-melanoma skin cancer are treated in more than 3.3 million people.1
 
Each year there are more new cases of skin cancer 1 than the combined incidence of cancers of the breast, prostate, lung and colon.
 
Over the past three decades, more people have had skin cancer than all other cancers combined.
 
One in five Americans will develop skin cancer in the course of a lifetime.
 
Between 40 and 50 percent of Americans who live to age 65 will have either basal cell carcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma at least once.
 
Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common form of skin cancer.6 More than 4 million cases are diagnosed in the U.S. each year.
 
Squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common form of skin cancer.7 More than 1 million cases are diagnosed in the U.S. each year.
 
Actinic keratosis is the most common pre-cancer; it affects more than 58 million Americans.
 
About 90 percent of non melanoma skin cancers are associated with exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun.
 
The annual cost of treating skin cancers in the U.S. is estimated at $8.1 billion: about $4.8 billion for non melanoma skin cancers and $3.3 billion for melanoma.
 

MELANOMA

One person dies of melanoma every hour (every 54 minutes).
 
An estimated 87,110 new cases of invasive melanoma will be diagnosed in the U.S. in 2017.
 
An estimated 9,730 people will die of melanoma in 2017.
 
Melanoma accounts for less than one percent of skin cancer cases, but the vast majority of skin cancer deaths.
 
The vast majority of melanomas are caused by the sun. In fact, one UK study found that about 86 percent of melanomas can be attributed to exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun.
 
The estimated 5-year survival rate for patients whose melanoma is detected early is about 98 percent in the U.S. The survival rate falls to 62 percent when the disease reaches the lymph nodes, and 18 percent when the disease metastasizes to distant organs.
 
On average, a person’s risk for melanoma doubles if he or she has had more than five sunburns.
 
Regular daily use of an SPF 15 or higher sunscreen reduces the risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma by about 40 percent 15 and the risk of developing melanoma by 50 percent.

SKIN AGING

An estimated 90 percent of skin aging is caused by the sun.
 
People who use sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher daily show 24 percent less skin aging than those who do not use sunscreen daily.
 
Sun damage is cumulative. Only about 23 percent of lifetime exposure occurs by age 18.

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